Connect back-end to front-end other than shared folders (1 Viewer)

Alhakeem1977

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Hi,

I have got a Microsoft Access split database in a local network through shared folder.

I am wondering if there's a way whereby I can connect the front-end to back-end without the shared folder through localhost?

Because I am getting deficulty to normalize all the users in a one partition like I am using the "A" drive sometimes it been utilized by other departments.

Thank on advance!

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theDBguy

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Hi. Yes, you could try using an UNC path to the backend file. Hope that helps...
 

Alhakeem1977

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Hi. Yes, you could try using an UNC path to the backend file. Hope that helps...
Thanks a lot for your prompt response.

I have just heard about the UNC path. Is it easy to implement this path as the normal connection? Because I am experiencing delay in request and response.

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theDBguy

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Thanks a lot for your prompt response.

I have just heard about the UNC path. Is it easy to implement this path as the normal connection? Because I am experiencing delay in request and response.

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Hi. As long as the only thing you changed was the links, then no, it shouldn't make any difference. When you use a mapped drive, it gets resolved into UNC anyway; so if anything, I think using UNC should perform faster.
 

Alhakeem1977

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Hi. As long as the only thing you changed was the links, then no, it shouldn't make any difference. When you use a mapped drive, it gets resolved into UNC anyway; so if anything, I think using UNC should perform faster.
Thanks theDBguy for you clarifications.

I heard about moving the back-end from MS Access to SQL Server is that much faster than UNC?

I think it will not need a shared folder if it's connects to SQL Server right?
By the way I have got one text field stores file path, how can I help it if will connect to SQL Server or UNC?

Sorry to ask you a stumped questions.

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theDBguy

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Thanks theDBguy for you clarifications.

I heard about moving the back-end from MS Access to SQL Server is that much faster than UNC?

I think it will not need a shared folder if it's connects to SQL Server right?
By the way I have got one text field stores file path, how can I help it if will connect to SQL Server or UNC?

Sorry to ask you a stumped questions.

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Moving to SQL Server might actually be slower because it requires a different approach than Access.
 

The_Doc_Man

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Using a UNC path to an Access "native" back end file (i.e. Jet or ACE engine) is totally not the same as connecting to an SQL Server back end file. It is possible that you would need to convert the native files to SQL Server format at some point because there are some differences in interpretation of some field types. (E.g. Access really only has one date/time data type; SQL Server has more than one. Other differences exist as well.)

UNC works so well that I was astonished the first time I tried it. It was at a U.S. Navy site and we had more that 26 remote drives to be mapped because of some ... shall we say aggressive file and resource sharing? So my low-priority little Access DB ran out of drive letters.

I changed the tables to UNC mapping, but then to make life easier, I also created single-table queries that merely established a query that identically matched the table structure. As crazy as that sounds, it worked so sweetly that nobody noticed all the foolishness that so many of the other projects encountered. I swear by that technique now.
 

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