Death (1 Viewer)

Libre

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Let’s talk turkey here, shall we? I know it’s not a subject we like to dwell on, but I’ve been thinking about it for quite awhile – probably every day for at least a moment, since I was 7 or 8. I’d like to get it out of my system – or at least put it to paper.
We all know that someday we’re going to die. We’ve known it since we were young children, when our pet turtle or goldfish (seemingly evolved just to teach us this lesson) went belly up. If we had caring parents they gently informed us that our little pet had been a living creature and that all living creatures eventually must stop living. They “pass on”. We buried the pet in the backyard, or gave it a “burial at sea” (flussshhhhh). We may have experienced a moment of grief – maybe a bit longer if the pet was a real member of the family like a dog or cat and had been with us for awhile. But we saw that even without our precious companion, our own existence continued much the same as it had been before. Life went on.
As time passed and we matured, we realized that it wasn’t only little creatures that lived in bowls on our dressers that died. Actual people died too. It may have been a grandparent or that of a friend, and then we had to go to a real funeral. Everyone was upset. Adults were crying! From there, it didn’t take any great leap of imagination to realize that someday we, too, would kick off.
More time passed and then it wasn’t just the ancient and elderly that passed on. Then it was our parent’s generation, and then our own contemporaries. Live long enough and you’ll see folks younger than yourself go. What an adjustment we have to make in our concept of the progression of life, to see it happen.
When I was born, the life expectancy of a male in developed countries was roughly the age that I have now attained. That realization was like a bucket of ice water in the face.
Where will I be in 10 years from now, or 20? 10 years ago was just a moment previous – I’m still dealing with issues that arose 10 years ago. I still have socks on the floor that I’ve been meaning to pick up for that long. In 10 years I’ll actually be old. I’m fighting it now and holding my own, but nobody wins this fight. Death is patient. Death doesn’t care. It just is.
I’m not really afraid of death (I don’t think) – it’s the dying that is scary. I hope it doesn’t hurt much. I have a red welt on my neck, a split nail, aches all over, a stent in my LAD coronary artery, and I take 5 or 6 medications. Well, I just hope that whatever may be beyond (if anything) they know how to have a good time. See ya (for now, that is – I’m not checking out just yet).
 

The_Doc_Man

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We each have a way that we want to go - or don't want to go.

My father-in-law had the best way (in my opinion). He ate supper, sat in his recliner, and was watching Crossfire on TV. Went to sleep. Didn't wake up. When my mother-in-law called us over, we saw that there was no sign of strain, pain, or struggle anywhere. He had laid his head back and had his mouth open like he was snoring. We believe he died of a cardiac arrhythmia that just shut down his heart. (He was being treated for arrythmia.) If you are going to go, that seems to be the way to do it.

Now me? I have a different ambition. I hope to go at age 105 by being shot by a jealous husband who catches me in the act with his 25-year-old wife. OK, the odds aren't so good on that one - but what a way to go if I could just make it happen!
 

Libre

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The_Doc_Man - your father-in-law went the way i would choose.
 

Galaxiom

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A friend of mine's father literally died laughing. He had a heart attack after they told him a joke. He was about 90 when he went and said he was surprised each morning when he woke up.

Gene Pitney didn't do too bad. He went to his room after having done his regular performance at the club where he also lived and that is where they found his body later that night.
 

Libre

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Talk about strange deaths - I copy and pasted this from Wiki about Dick Shawn. You may remember Shawn as the guy who played the loopy Hitler in the show within the show - Springtime for Hitler in the movie The Producers.

On April 17, 1987, Shawn died while performing at UC San Diego's Mandeville Hall. When he collapsed face down on the stage, the audience thought it was part of his act unaware that he had actually suffered a massive heart attack. During his final comedy routine, Shawn portrayed a politician reciting campaign clichés including: "If elected, I will not lay down on the job."
After five minutes of lying motionless on the stage, during which time there had been catcalls like "take his wallet", a stage hand came on, examined Shawn, stood up and asked: "Is there a doctor in the house?" Another person appeared, turned him over and began administering CPR.
The audience was asked to leave the auditorium but almost no one left since many thought it was all part of Shawn's act. Bewildered audience members only began leaving - still unsure of what they had witnessed - after paramedics arrived.[3] A notice in the following day's San Diego Union newspaper clarified that Shawn had indeed died during the performance.[4] Dick Shawn was 63. He is laid to rest in Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery, a Jewish cemetery, in Culver City, California.
 

scott-atkinson

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The great late Tommy Cooper, a British Comedian and accomplished Magician died on stage during his act also, and again the audience thought it was part of the act...
 

scott-atkinson

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Im not afraid of dying, I just don't want to go yet until my children are old enough to look after themselves and have families of their own so they do not have the time to mourn me too much..

Having lost my father when I was nine years old and knowing the inner turmoil that I went through and how it shaped my future life, I do not want my children to have to experience that...
 

Libre

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scott- I lost my own father at the age of 12, so I do know what you've been through. I still miss him every day - and it was 50 years ago that he died.
I'm not afraid of death itself (although I'm sure I COULD work up a sweat about it) as much as the process of dying. All our lives we strive to improve, to increase our knowledge, stamina, wisdom, understanding of the world, and physical strength. The reverse process - that of diminishment - the ultimate end of which is where we are nothing at all - that is what is terrifying to me. It's not so bad if it's real quick - and I've had friends who were here one moment and gone the next - like Doc Man's father in law. But I've also seen the slow disintegration (over years) of progressive disease and the hideous consequences of that process. THAT is what scares the bejesus out of me.
Already I'm aware that there were things I could do easily in my "prime" that are now far beyond my ability. Physical things, mainly. Mentally I'm as estute as ever! What was I just saying...????? Oh yeah, well - I don't like it - not one little bit. So I go to the gym 4 times a week. A lot of people my age (63) have artificial knees and hips, are waaaayyyyy out of shape, can't exercise effectively, can't remember their SSN (for you brits that's their Social Security Number - mine is like, 4). But no matter how well I try to keep it all together, losing what I have is a bitter pill to swallow - and I have no kids. But we all have business that will one day be unfinished, kids or no.
 
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Brianwarnock

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I thought that you were old till you said you were 63. Thinking you are old at that age is so wrong, so negative. I lead the local U3A walking group at 73 I'm not quite the baby of the group but we have several in their 80s , true the group only does 7 to 10 miles but they never stop talking and are often heading out to other activities in the evening. Quit the gym it is bad for you as you tend to strain go walking with people when you can have interesting discussions.

Brian
 

Libre

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Brian - at every age you are both old and young. There's always someone who is older than you to tell you you're just a kid. Most of the people I work with have no concept of the time I grew up in.
At 63 I've seen 3/5 of my nuclear family die, and 3/6 of my wife's. At 8 I thought I was old. At 55 I started a new career. What one thinks of themselves can't be "wrong". Sometimes I do feel awfully old though. Sometimes the daily stresses of life get to be too much. Working out vigorously is the best way to fight the evil dragon. Strolling and chatting with older folks would not do it for me (nothing wrong with it, but I have other goals as far as exercise). I bike commuted to work daily (20 miles round trip) until I started at the gym after work - on advice of cardiologist. I do miss the biking but there is just so much time in the day. Also the gym is a heck of a lot safer.
Well - as I said I'm not checking out just yet.
 
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Brianwarnock

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Who said we strolled, we walk, but I'm glad you are not as decrepit a s you made yourself sound in the previous post. :D

Brian
 

Libre

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Who said we strolled, we walk, but I'm glad you are not as decrepit a s you made yourself sound in the previous post. :D

Brian

Ha - I just logged on to change the word "strolled" because I realized it might rub you the wrong way.
I really don't think of myself as decrepit at all. I could ride my bike 100 miles. Well 70 at least. Well it's been a few years. Having a "massive heart attack" (not my words) did nothing to enhance my sense of youthfullness.
Brian - aren't there times you feel like a ute (in the famous words of My Cousin Vinny) and other times an old fart?
 

Brianwarnock

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I have no idea what a ute is, but I never feel like an old fart, sure things aren't what they were, I can't stride up the hills like I used to and coming down steep declines can really hurt the quads, plus doing crosswords takes longer, this is due to the massive amount of information in the brain , the index system needs an overhaul. :D

I do feel oldish when playing with my grandchildren, they run round in circles and I go dizzy, why don't four year olds get dizzy?

I guess if one has had a heart attack or other serious problem it does make one take stock.

Brian
 

Libre

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Brian-
ute = youth with a Brooklyn accent.
From the very funny and dearly loved movie My Cousin Vinny.
 

scott-atkinson

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I'm 45 years old, and I quit doing the whole Gym thing years ago, I keep fit by dancing, I go to a dance class 3 times a week, and dance from 8pm to 11pm. I love it, its very socialable, I have met some lovely people, one of whom is my girlfriend. There are guys and girls in their 70's jiving around the dance floor with so much energy, I hope I still have that much gumph when I am their ages...
 

The_Doc_Man

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At age 66, with a recent arthroscopic knee surgery a few months behind me, I'm up to walking 3 miles per day (in just over 1 hour) and I have been working on watching what I eat. Now if I could just get a better handle on how much I eat...

After a few scares, I started taking better care of myself before things went totally out of whack. Yes, I'm on meds - but these days, what older person isn't?

Scott, I agree that dancing is a great exercise, particularly if you have a venue that plays 1940s-1950s era swing and jive. Also helps if you have a great partner. Alas, between my bum knee that does OK on straightaways but doesn't handle side-to-side too well, and my wife's hip problems after her car accident a few years ago, my dancing days are strictly limited. But for a while, I was an Arthur Murray Silver-standard student. In fact, I met my dear wife at a dance.

On another part of this forum (the News section), we hear about ChrisO and, a couple of years ago, DCrake. I may have to arrange for one of my computer-literate step-kids to be my amanuensis when the time comes. But I'm working to ward off that situation for a while yet.
 

ConnorGiles

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I know I cannot have much of a say in the ways of being old, I say this with hesitation because I am indeed very young in the eyes of my elders.

I am 18 close to 19 years of age (Before people say I am too young to comment on anything at all - I do believe I was born out of my age gap)

I never liked the whole going out and drinking polava ( I don't drink, Smoke, Club), I've been in a relationship since I was in school and have enjoyed every second of it.

A lot of my friends have claimed that I settled down too soon, But I tend to tell them on the contrary.

I work a full time job and have ever since I left college, and I do not regret this decision as I think it has matured me in many more ways than University ever could. (This does not mean I will never attend university).

I find comfort in knowledge, If there is something I have found interest in I tend to study it profusely until I have a moderate understanding of what I am reading.

I read every sentence of this thread so far and have enjoyed it thoroughly, just because of all of you wonderful people sharing what you want to achieve and what you have achieved through your time.

I do really respect every one of you and hope that we do hear of many more achievements you have accomplished. Ill be waiting for the comment :p

Thanks for your time

Hope my age doesn't stir this thread the wrong way.

Connor :D
 

Vassago

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I know I cannot have much of a say in the ways of being old, I say this with hesitation because I am indeed very young in the eyes of my elders.

I am 18 close to 19 years of age (Before people say I am too young to comment on anything at all - I do believe I was born out of my age gap)

I never liked the whole going out and drinking polava ( I don't drink, Smoke, Club), I've been in a relationship since I was in school and have enjoyed every second of it.

A lot of my friends have claimed that I settled down too soon, But I tend to tell them on the contrary.

I work a full time job and have ever since I left college, and I do not regret this decision as I think it has matured me in many more ways than University ever could. (This does not mean I will never attend university).

I find comfort in knowledge, If there is something I have found interest in I tend to study it profusely until I have a moderate understanding of what I am reading.

I read every sentence of this thread so far and have enjoyed it thoroughly, just because of all of you wonderful people sharing what you want to achieve and what you have achieved through your time.

I do really respect every one of you and hope that we do hear of many more achievements you have accomplished. Ill be waiting for the comment :p

Thanks for your time

Hope my age doesn't stir this thread the wrong way.

Connor :D

This sounds like my story. Of course, I would learn later 7 years later that I perhaps DID settle down too early as my marriage ended in divorce. I'll have my fingers crossed that yours does not turn out the same way. ;)

Of course, after my divorce, I finally did some of the going out drinking and having fun I didn't experience in my earlier adulthood. :D :p
 

ConnorGiles

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I'm very sorry to hear this Vassago!

I thank you for your positive wishes! :p

I am very glad you did get to experience those feelings :D
 

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