Dev Version: 2010, Client Version: 2007--Any Predictable Issues? (1 Viewer)

Isaac

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If I, using Access 2010 desktop version, make an accdb file for my client, and they have Access 2007 desktop version, I'm thinking that should generally speaking be acceptable, right?

Note: No ActiveX controls, no calendars, no API functions.

This will be a very limited-purpose database - a SINGLE file that they will use on a single machine for the purpose of importing, analyzing, processing and manipulating large datasets at once. So the database will pretty much just be local tables, lots of queries, perhaps a simple form with a tab control, and lots of VBA functions.

Only 1 person at a time will be using it to process data, once per day or week.

I would have them install 2010 (which is what I'm using to develop it), it's just that they saw a super cheap 2007 license and wanted to do that - I told them I think that will be OK. Was I right? All you experts in versions and how they play well or not with each other ...
 

theDBguy

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Hi Isaac. It's been a while since I used 2007; but if I remember correctly, try to avoid using a layout grid on your forms.
 

conception_native_0123

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Was I right? All you experts in versions and how they play well or not with each other ...
someone want to tell him I said this? he probably won't see this. the only thing I forsee is the issue with different database formatting and data macros, but I don't believe those were introduced before 2010 version. It doesn't seem to be an issue, but then again you are working with backward compatibility because you are dev'ing in 2010 and working in 2007. might want to keep that in mind. VBA won't be an issue. simplicity of the file won't be an issue. backwards compatibility should NOT be an issue. I don't really see anything.
 

theDBguy

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layout grid? is that a TYPE of GRID? or just the style of viewing that is so popular with all versions?
It's a feature where you can control the size and alignment of several controls on the form. The two available styles are stacked and tabular.
 

Isaac

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Okay, thanks dbGuy. I just convinced them to use a VPS with SQL Server Express and SSDT for ETL'ing - so Access's footprint just got reduced at least somewhat. This definitely does not seem problematic then.

Thanks for the tip.
 

Galaxiom

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it's just that they saw a super cheap 2007 license and wanted to do that
Whatever the price, it wasn't worth it. You could have used Access 2010 or later runtime which are completely free. Moreover runtime prevents the users being able to do anything.
 

Isaac

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I don't want to use runtime, I want to have a full version installed on the client's machine. maybe I'll just have them do 2010 then to be safe
 

isladogs

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There are other issues such as themes and IIRC A2007 lacks back colour formatting of text controls - may need to check that.
Also avoid version specific references such as Excel by using late binding
I know @Gasman uses A2007 and is unable to open a lot of Access apps from forums

When developing in A2010 or later, the method I use to make ACCDB versions compatible for A2007 is to first save it as A2003 MDB format then resave that as ACCDB
 

Pat Hartman

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Colin's idea is a good one but you will still have reference issues if you are referring to any of the other Office libraries.

You need to develop in the same version as the users or an earlier version. If you develop in a newer version, You need to use late binding to avoid reference issues and you have to be extremely careful to not use any features not available in their version. Even simply trying some of the new features and then deleting the objects is enough to prevent older versions of Access from opening your app.
 

Isaac

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Well, I virtually never use early binding when referencing other Office apps, learned that lesson a long time ago.
Like I said, this app will be VERY simple - mostly queries with functions that have always been around, and VBA functions, and tables. Maybe one simple form with a tab control.
 

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