Access and the Future (1 Viewer)

SteveF

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I haven't done anything with Access for a long while but my last big project, a stocktaking DB, is still working like a charm. It's still my daily workhorse and has kept me going for the best part of ten years so absolute kudos to all the knowledgable folk here and the few who I drove potty personally whilst developing it.

My question for now is twofold really:

Is Access still the right way to go if you're starting a big project, are there any signs that it won't be around in a few years?

Also, assuming it is what version would you be using now? I have 2007 installed (I know!) and I really liked it because I paid for it and then it was mine to keep. I'm guessing that later/current versions are subscription? The whole world seems to have gone that way so it would be a surprise if MS were not.

Thanks in advance for help; as ever.

Steve
 

Isaac

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Access is not going anywhere and, frankly, on my side-jobs (non-corporate) client projects, I actually try to stick with desktop installs of 2007 or 2010 (not 365 and no subscriptions), which you can easily buy a license for $20-$40 on software repair world.

I also use 365 (in corporate world), but have yet to find anything significant that's better than 2007 or 2010 for my own personal values/projects.

HTH

Welcome back. :)
 

The_Doc_Man

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The only "down" side on this is the Microsoft "Leasing" model - SaaS or Software as a Service - that means that your client incurs an extra yearly fee if you use something out of O365. That means you will get updates to Access now and then, which may "break" something. We all know how one little update will cascade all around a system, right? But as long as it brings in money, Microsoft will probably not do away with a cash cow even if it isn't as high a producer as Word or Excel or Powerpoint.
 

SteveF

Registered User.
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Access is not going anywhere and, frankly, on my side-jobs (non-corporate) client projects, I actually try to stick with desktop installs of 2007 or 2010 (not 365 and no subscriptions), which you can easily buy a license for $20-$40 on software repair world.

I also use 365 (in corporate world), but have yet to find anything significant that's better than 2007 or 2010 for my own personal values/projects.

HTH

Welcome back. :)
Thanks for the welcome :)

I'm super rusty but there's nothing complex about the new project at this stage, just a few forms and data storage, so I'll make a start with some confidence that I'm not heading into a technological dead-end; thanks for that.
 

SteveF

Registered User.
Local time
Today, 17:53
Joined
Jul 13, 2008
Messages
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The only "down" side on this is the Microsoft "Leasing" model - SaaS or Software as a Service - that means that your client incurs an extra yearly fee if you use something out of O365. That means you will get updates to Access now and then, which may "break" something. We all know how one little update will cascade all around a system, right? But as long as it brings in money, Microsoft will probably not do away with a cash cow even if it isn't as high a producer as Word or Excel or Powerpoint.

I struggle with the 'lease' model on these things, I much prefer a world where I buy something and it's mine to keep but the world changes. I'm pleased to find that Access 2007 is still relevant though; a little light in my cynical worldview :)

Thanks for input guys; appreciated.
 

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