"No current record" error now affecting all versions of my database (1 Viewer)

GPGeorge

Grover Park George
Local time
Yesterday, 16:57
Joined
Nov 25, 2004
Messages
770
The problem seems to have been fixed. I was also hit by this, and had to tweak my code that involved Recordset, like the posters did above. But note that this had nothing to do with Recordset nor our coding skills. All the errors in this little mishap had nothing to do with anything. It was just a silly bug that seemed to have produced random inconsequential symptoms. If this had happened only in a full moon at midnight, we would've been tempted to think that we shouldn't use Access in a full moon at midnight.

P.S. The really annoying thing was that those errors were untrappable. They just popped up after I had closed a form and all code execution had ended. These were completely phantom errors. I even got an "automation" error that actually referenced a variable's name in my code.
To my way of thinking, the most annoying thing is that most of us are now trained to expect bugs, large or small, in Access on or around the first Tuesday of each month....
 

isladogs

CID VIP
Local time
Today, 00:57
Joined
Jan 14, 2017
Messages
16,389
I was aware of this feature and MS have used it before e.g. last Nov/Dec to undo an update without needing another version release
Unfortunately, it can't be applied in all cases or the 'monster bug' would have been fixed 4 years ago ....

I'm still unclear why I didn't experience the bug even when I tried replicating the causes I had seen described elsewhere.
Perhaps the 'feature switch off' was done earlier for some customers than others but, as I'm UK based, I doubt it was the case for me.

I'm also unsure what yesterday's update to build 15128.20224 was used for as it seems that wasn't the bug fix.
 

NauticalGent

CopyPaster of the First Order
Local time
Yesterday, 19:57
Joined
Apr 27, 2015
Messages
5,135
To my way of thinking, the most annoying thing is that most of us are now trained to expect bugs, large or small, in Access on or around the first Tuesday of each month....
Like boiling frogs...
 

Isaac

Lifelong Learner
Local time
Yesterday, 16:57
Joined
Mar 14, 2017
Messages
6,678
and had to tweak my code that involved Recordset, like the posters did above. But note that this had nothing to do with Recordset

+

Just updated 365 again to 15128.20224. All still OK it seems

+

Interesting. I've had 365 v2204 build 15128.20178 for a while on several workstations and still haven't experienced this bug. Lucky me!
I tried the example app from post #32 and it works for me without error.

I guess maybe I should pivot to simply trying to say it's a matter of perspective.

I, for one, after reading decades of posts about Windows Update (about half of which are really the fault of Windows Update, and half of which are not), have come to conclude that sometimes, we might be too quick to blame Windows Update.

I see it very similar to when a poster comes along and says stuff like: "Access gets angry when I try to open a SQL Server recordset".
No, Access does not get angry. There is a way to do it and if it doesn't work there is an actual reason it's not working.

If Windows changes their operating system to disallow default permissions to local users on %AppData\Roaming%, or something, my code might suddenly "stop working". Also, I didn't put in place anything to check whether they did or didn't have permissions to that folder, and proceed to handle it appropriately - like use a different folder. In this context, is it fair to simply say: "Windows Update broke my database" - and that's it?
Not really, I don't think, it's a matter of perspective. That may not even be the best example, but you get the point.

Another piece of evidence to consider is some people's databases all seem to break on every Update, others hardly ever if ever do.
There may be several reasons for that, but I think we'd be prudent to consider what all of those reasons may be...
Because of human nature, we tend to only consider the reasons that paint us in a good light as developers, and Windows as the bogeyman/culprit.
I think it's clear by this point that my reasoning goes something like this: Everyone's code is based on assumptions...The question becomes how reasonable those assumptions were.

Yes, Windows Update sometimes just breaks things with no defense, explanation or justification.
No, that's not the case every time a Windows change breaks your code.
 

NauticalGent

CopyPaster of the First Order
Local time
Yesterday, 19:57
Joined
Apr 27, 2015
Messages
5,135
I guess maybe I should pivot to simply trying to say it's a matter of perspective.

I, for one, after reading decades of posts about Windows Update (about half of which are really the fault of Windows Update, and half of which are not), have come to conclude that sometimes, we might be too quick to blame Windows Update.

I see it very similar to when a poster comes along and says stuff like: "Access gets angry when I try to open a SQL Server recordset".
No, Access does not get angry. There is a way to do it and if it doesn't work there is an actual reason it's not working.

If Windows changes their operating system to disallow default permissions to local users on %AppData\Roaming%, or something, my code might suddenly "stop working". Also, I didn't put in place anything to check whether they did or didn't have permissions to that folder, and proceed to handle it appropriately - like use a different folder. In this context, is it fair to simply say: "Windows Update broke my database" - and that's it?
Not really, I don't think, it's a matter of perspective. That may not even be the best example, but you get the point.

Another piece of evidence to consider is some people's databases all seem to break on every Update, others hardly ever if ever do.
There may be several reasons for that, but I think we'd be prudent to consider what all of those reasons may be...
Because of human nature, we tend to only consider the reasons that paint us in a good light as developers, and Windows as the bogeyman/culprit.
I think it's clear by this point that my reasoning goes something like this: Everyone's code is based on assumptions...The question becomes how reasonable those assumptions were.

Yes, Windows Update sometimes just breaks things with no defense, explanation or justification.
No, that's not the case every time a Windows change breaks your code.

Isaac

Oh jeez...a MS sympathizer! Isn't there a 12-step program for that??
 

OuterApply

New member
Local time
Yesterday, 16:57
Joined
Mar 10, 2022
Messages
15
I guess maybe I should pivot to simply trying to say it's a matter of perspective.

I, for one, after reading decades of posts about Windows Update (about half of which are really the fault of Windows Update, and half of which are not), have come to conclude that sometimes, we might be too quick to blame Windows Update.

I see it very similar to when a poster comes along and says stuff like: "Access gets angry when I try to open a SQL Server recordset".
No, Access does not get angry. There is a way to do it and if it doesn't work there is an actual reason it's not working.

If Windows changes their operating system to disallow default permissions to local users on %AppData\Roaming%, or something, my code might suddenly "stop working". Also, I didn't put in place anything to check whether they did or didn't have permissions to that folder, and proceed to handle it appropriately - like use a different folder. In this context, is it fair to simply say: "Windows Update broke my database" - and that's it?
Not really, I don't think, it's a matter of perspective. That may not even be the best example, but you get the point.

Another piece of evidence to consider is some people's databases all seem to break on every Update, others hardly ever if ever do.
There may be several reasons for that, but I think we'd be prudent to consider what all of those reasons may be...
Because of human nature, we tend to only consider the reasons that paint us in a good light as developers, and Windows as the bogeyman/culprit.
I think it's clear by this point that my reasoning goes something like this: Everyone's code is based on assumptions...The question becomes how reasonable those assumptions were.

Yes, Windows Update sometimes just breaks things with no defense, explanation or justification.
No, that's not the case every time a Windows change breaks your code.

Isaac

Oh jeez...a MS sympathizer! Isn't there a 12-step program for that??
a "Mazi"
 

Sodslaw

Registered User.
Local time
Yesterday, 16:57
Joined
Jun 7, 2017
Messages
77
just wanted to put my 2 cents into this long chain. :( and late for this party
as i understand it you are having issues since you split the back end and others accessing the BE are experiencing similar issues?

look at the server and check the folder permissions of the BE file. make sure users have full controll and that its a windows OS.

just where i would look 1st, if im holding the stick at the wrong end then PLS ignore the post LOL
 

TheSearcher

Registered User.
Local time
Yesterday, 19:57
Joined
Jul 21, 2011
Messages
229
Try: DoCmd.OpenForm "frmQuoteOverview", acNormal, , "[QuoteID]=" & cint(Me![QuoteID])
 

strive4peace

AWF VIP
Local time
Yesterday, 18:57
Joined
Apr 3, 2020
Messages
921
EDIT: oh gosh, I see lots of comment I didn't see before ... but to avoid issues, this is good to read anyway ...

hi @zebrafoot

try this ... before:
DoCmd.OpenForm ...
and before
DoCmd.Close acForm, "frmQuotes"
and before code that takes it somewhere else

do this:
Rich (BB code):
with me
   'save record if it has been changed
   if .dirty then .dirty =false
end with

to save current record if it needs it.

Another time I've seen this issue is when RecordSources and/or RowSources use controls on the form for criteria
 

isladogs

CID VIP
Local time
Today, 00:57
Joined
Jan 14, 2017
Messages
16,389
Hello,

This error usually occurs when the user tries to change the shared SysData folder location from the Admin/Organization screen. You will get the “No current record” error message in MS Access when trying to print or preview the report by using the Print command or the Print Preview After then move between the report pages.

Method 1: Applies To Access 2007/2003

Well, you can easily fix the Runtime Error ‘3021’ No Current Record, using one of the following methods:
  • Make a change in the Group On group property to Interval for one of the field groups.
  • Modify the Group Footer group property to “No” for one of the field groups.
  • From the group footer eliminate calculations.
Method 2: Applies to Access 2010 | 2013 | 2016

This Access “No Current Record Error” occurs after the failure of the Find methods or the Seek method. When the original record set contains no record or it has been getting deleted somehow.

Either Move to or select any other record and try the procedure again. If the Recordset is empty, you can’t position the current record. So, check the BOF and EOF properties.

I hope these methods could help you to solve this runtime error.

Best Regards,
Cheryl

@Cherylodge
As always with your posts, you have just googled the error mentioned, used the sponsored article from the search and then copied and pasted part of the article without giving the source.

In this case, the article you copied was [Edit: from another site]

As always, its an article encouraging readers to spend money purchasing [Edit: something].
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Users who are viewing this thread

Top Bottom