Database locking issue (1 Viewer)

majid.pervaiz

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Dear All,
I have a database which I have divided into front end for multiple users and backend (I.e database) on a shared server. This shared server is managed by IT team and the folder where I have database we have read and write permissions.
we are around 10 users of this shared database.
Suddenly, the database is locked and only one user is able to access is. Anytime 2nd user is trying to access it gives an error file is already in use.
Even though everyone logged out of database but still lock file is showing next to the main database file.
Please help to explain in an easy way since I am not too much tech guy.
 

The_Doc_Man

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I'm going to step in with a different answer ONLY because it is possible that your issue isn't the bug that both theDBguy and arnelgp have referenced. (BUT this is if and only if their answer doesn't work... 'cause they are probably right.)

The problem may be incorrect permissions. If you have only read/write permissions, that might not be enough. You need MODIFY permissions on the shared folder and the files in it. If your IT guys object, offer them this detailed solution:

Create a GROUP IDENTIFIER with some convenient name. Create an Access Control List on the shared folder and (as is normally the case) allow all permissions to be inherited to the files in that folder. Besides the usual ADMINISTRATOR:FULL CONTROL entry and some entries granting elevated privileges for BACKUP OPERATOR and whatever other administrative overhead is required/customary, have a later entry with this newly created group identifier having MODIFY permissions, but then have a FINAL entry with EVERYONE:NO ACCESS (and when I say final, I mean it. The NO ACCESS entry MUST be the last one in the list.) That should give pretty good protection on the shared files. And then, give the IT folks a list of users who need to be granted that group identifier (including yourself).
 

Pat Hartman

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You'd think if MS could come up with a fix in three days that they could stop the bad update from spreading around the country and around the world:(
 

GPGeorge

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You'd also think MS would do minimal acceptance testing before releasing updates.....
 

Minty

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You'd also think MS would do minimal acceptance testing before releasing updates.....
They need something for the Access developers to do.
They've been twiddling their thumbs for at least 12 months...
 

Minty

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Oh yes - re-inventing sharepoint, sorry I forgot.
I wish I could see the point, but maybe I need new glasses.

There is nothing in the "Dataverse" that can't be better achieved with a proper RBDMS be it SQL, Azure, Oracle, SQL Express.
If someone can tell me otherwise I'm all ears, and will go to Specsavers.
 

majid.pervaiz

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I'm going to step in with a different answer ONLY because it is possible that your issue isn't the bug that both theDBguy and arnelgp have referenced. (BUT this is if and only if their answer doesn't work... 'cause they are probably right.)

The problem may be incorrect permissions. If you have only read/write permissions, that might not be enough. You need MODIFY permissions on the shared folder and the files in it. If your IT guys object, offer them this detailed solution:

Create a GROUP IDENTIFIER with some convenient name. Create an Access Control List on the shared folder and (as is normally the case) allow all permissions to be inherited to the files in that folder. Besides the usual ADMINISTRATOR:FULL CONTROL entry and some entries granting elevated privileges for BACKUP OPERATOR and whatever other administrative overhead is required/customary, have a later entry with this newly created group identifier having MODIFY permissions, but then have a FINAL entry with EVERYONE:NO ACCESS (and when I say final, I mean it. The NO ACCESS entry MUST be the last one in the list.) That should give pretty good protection on the shared files. And then, give the IT folks a list of users who need to be granted that group identifier (including yourself).
Dear we have modify permission as well on the folder
 

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