Presume This is a Scam (1 Viewer)

Gasman

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One of my bosses put a shortcut or file on his desktop.
Then I believe he deleted it, from the folder, but the icon remains on his desktop. I had a quick look and could not delete the icon from the desktop. Apparently he contacted MS and they could not either???
 

isladogs

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Paul
How is that related to this thread?
 

AccessBlaster

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Microsoft sets these new arbitrary requirements because they have symbiotic relationship with computer manufacturers. This includes a monopoly on operating systems. Microsoft artificially causes computers sales by adjusting their device requirements. Everyone is happy except the consumer, of course.
 

Gasman

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Just the fact that if one could upgrade to a supported O/S, it might not be the best advised route to take.
As the O/P is not connecting to net, that well might be moot, but still, not sure Win11 is the next path to take?
As you know, I still use 2007, so have none of these recent issues, only because I have no need to upgrade and then get all these issues you and others 'at the sharp point' do. :)
Sorry, answered on my phone, reply was to @isladogs
 

KitaYama

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If you download the ISO you'll need to install it onto a flash drive with Rufus.
Microsoft offers an app to burn the iso to a usb flash memory or DVD and install the OS. You can not not configure the installation, but using that app doesn't check for the requirements. I've used it at least on 10 PCs during the last few months and was able to install win 11 without any problem (I was receiving the "requirements doesn't meet" warning when I tried to update on the same PCs)


Anything has a lifetime and will not be supported after that.
 
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AccessBlaster

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Fun fact:
For English speaking countries, if you specify English International instead of English United States when selecting the ISO it will omitt the bloat like candy crush and other bloat.
 

isladogs

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Of course, announcing end of security update support dates are designed to encourage users to update
Microsoft are as guilty of planning built-in obsolescence as any other manufacturer. No more. No less.

However, the reality is that Win 10 users do not need to upgrade for another 2 years or so.
Even then, Win 10 will continue to work for many years for those users who wish to stay on their existing OS, albeit with gradually increasing risk

For now, I'm happy to stay on Win 10
 

KitaYama

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Microsoft sets these new arbitrary requirements because they have symbiotic relationship with computer manufacturers. This includes a monopoly on operating systems. Microsoft artificially causes computers sales by adjusting their device requirements. Everyone is happy except the consumer, of course.
I've seen this kind of comments so many times but I think this time I will go on and ask the question I've always had in my mind.

Do you really think that a PC that was designed and manufactured 10 years ago is capable of running the latest OS?

There was a time I bought a PC with 16M byte memory and it was the most expensive and recent one. If you search dell.com, 16G byte is the standard type now. Do you really think today's applications/OS could have the same performance if Microsoft had not adjusted device requirements?
 

AccessBlaster

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I've seen this kind of comments so many times but I think this time I will go on and ask the question I've always had in my mind.

Do you really think that a PC that was designed and manufactured 10 years ago is capable of running the latest OS?

There was a time I bought a PC with 16M byte memory and it was the most expensive and recent one. If you search dell.com, 16G byte is the standard type now. Do you really think today's applications/OS could have the same performance if Microsoft had not adjusted device requirements?

I think there is a limit, but many people here and elsewhere are having their nearly new computers rejected for upgrades to the new OS. But the same people seem to benefit from companies like Rufus.

Planned obsolescence is not a conspiracy theory it's built into many products and programs.

I admit I love to tinker, I always load the latest OS but it's definitely not for business and the average user.
 

KitaYama

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I think there is a limit,......having their nearly new computers rejected for upgrades to the new OS
The only requirements that may have caused this rejects is Trusted Platform Module (TPM) version 2.0.
The following article may give you an insight why it is necessary.


And how you can blame Microsoft for asking TPM2 while other OS has been equipped with it from a long time ago.
From Wikipedia
  • The Trusted Platform Module 2.0 (TPM 2.0) has been supported by the Linux kernel since version 3.20.[89][90][91]
  • Google includes TPMs in Chromebooks as part of their security model.[92]
  • Oracle ships TPMs in their X- and T-Series Systems such as T3 or T4 series of servers.[93] Support is included in Solaris 11.[94]
  • In 2006, with the introduction of first Macintosh models with Intel processors, Apple started to ship Macs with TPM. Apple never provided an official driver, but there was a port under GPL available.[95] Apple has not shipped a computer with TPM since 2006.[96]
  • In 2011, Taiwanese manufacturer MSI launched its Windpad 110W tablet featuring an AMD CPU and Infineon Security Platform TPM, which ships with controlling software version 3.7. The chip is disabled by default but can be enabled with the included, pre-installed software.[97]
  • VMware ESXi hypervisor has supported TPM since 4.x, and from 5.0 it is enabled by default.[98][99]
  • Xen hypervisor has support of virtualized TPMs. Each guest gets its own unique, emulated, software TPM.[100]
  • KVM, combined with QEMU, has support for virtualized TPMs. As of 2012, it supports passing through the physical TPM chip to a single dedicated guest. QEMU 2.11 released in December 2017 also provides emulated TPMs to guests.[101]
  • VirtualBox has support for virtual TPM 1.2 and 2.0 devices starting with version 7.0 released in October 2022.[102]

And Why Mac doesn't need TPM

Most of the Mac devices doesn’t have the TPM inside their motherboard or CPU, so let’s discuss why these devices don’t come with the TPM-

T2 Chip
T2 is a security chip available in most Mac devices; this chip is Apple’s second-generation, custom silicon for Mac.
This T2 chip delivers capabilities to your Mac, such as encrypted storage, enhanced image and Signal processing and security for touch ID data.
Moreover, it also stores the cryptographic keys necessary to boot the machines it runs on securely.

In short, it can be said that the T2 chip works almost similar to a TPM (Trusted Platform Module) chip.

So, the point here is that there is no need to add (TPM) chip as they already have a similar T2 chip that does a similar job.
 
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Cotswold

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Dopy Sunday drivers clutter up the roads and Sunday surfers do the same on the internet. There was no reason for my PC run an error and not update. I switched it on at 6am on Monday and everything updated promptly. Now on 22H2. No chance of Win11 Pro there but no matter my other PCs are 11. But I expect that within two years I may well be mainly Unix
 
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Cotswold

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Do you own a copy of pro?
I have bought and paid for copies of Win10 Pro and Win11 Pro. I have a laptop that unfortunately came with Win10 Home. I prefer Pro.
But I do not see that any of that is anything to do with anyone actually.

Why do you ask?
 

AccessBlaster

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I have bought and paid for copies of Win10 Pro and Win11 Pro. I have a laptop that unfortunately came with Win10 Home. I prefer Pro.
But I do not see that any of that is anything to do with anyone actually.

Why do you ask?
Just wondering, I figured you might.
 

Isaac

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The smartest thing a scammer could do is to notice how many people feel 'sure' it's legitimate, so then the scammer simply makes a screen which looks almost entirely similar.

You never know. Best to go to the updates area and do it from there, never click what the advertisement wants you to - same principle with hyperlinks in emails. Never click them. Just go to the known website.
 

Isaac

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I've seen this kind of comments so many times but I think this time I will go on and ask the question I've always had in my mind.

Do you really think that a PC that was designed and manufactured 10 years ago is capable of running the latest OS?

There was a time I bought a PC with 16M byte memory and it was the most expensive and recent one. If you search dell.com, 16G byte is the standard type now. Do you really think today's applications/OS could have the same performance if Microsoft had not adjusted device requirements?
Wow, that's an interesting comment. I've never bought a machine with more than 8 GB of ram. Ever. And doing just fine.
My work jobs have provided me with 16 a couple times, but it was far more than necessary.
 

KitaYama

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I've never bought a machine with more than 8 GB of ram. Ever. And doing just fine.
My work jobs have provided me with 16 a couple times, but it was far more than necessary.
As you explained it really depends on what you plan to use your PC for. I have 64GB on a monster CPU and a graphic card with 16GB memory at work, yet I receive messages from OS that it’s suffering from lack of memory. I’ve asked IT for an upgrade to 128GB and I’m praying for their OK sign.
 

Isaac

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As you explained it really depends on what you plan to use your PC for. I have 64GB on a monster CPU and a graphic card with 16GB memory at work, yet I receive messages from OS that it’s suffering from lack of memory. I’ve asked IT for an upgrade to 128GB and I’m praying for their OK sign.

If spending the last 15 years trying to train my wife is any indication, the biggest mistake people make is carelessly leaving too many totally unneeded things running at once, and failing to clean up after themselves.

The question of what memory you need isn't only answered by "am I running out of memory". It's "what is my behavior like and am I taking care".

I can attest to the simple example that going for 3 weeks refusing to close Chrome tabs will run you out of just about any memory you have.

It's like money, you spend it thoughtfully, except many people don't - they just assume the computer should do 'whatever'.

It would be like never changing the oil in your car, and then finally concluding "I guess modern cars just need more oil"
 

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