Has God Ever Visted Plagues? (1 Viewer)

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I don't want to hijack the coronavirus thread here. Doc made an observation I thought was worth looking at.
You should know that God doesn't visit plagues upon Man any more. In fact, never did... ignorant people just blamed Him for it and then due to fear of that imaginary place of torment, excused the plagues as a form of deserved punishment. But the real explanation is simpler, and we can thank Forrest Gump for this dramatically clear statement on the reason for bad things: S H I T H A P P E N S.
I wonder if that's true, here is just one out of many references I found. Near the bottom I highlight what I think is a plague.

Jeremiah 24
The Good and the Bad Figs
24 After King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon had deported Jeconiah† son of Jehoiakim king of Judah, the officials of Judah, and the craftsmen and metalsmiths† from Jerusalem and had brought them to Babylon, the Lord showed me two baskets of figs† placed in front of the temple of the Lord. 2 One basket contained very good figs, like early figs,† but the other basket contained very bad figs, so bad they were inedible. 3 The Lord said to me, “What do you see, Jeremiah? ”
I said, “Figs! The good figs are very good, but the bad figs are extremely bad, so bad they are inedible.”
4 The word of the Lord came to me: 5 “This is what the Lord, the God of Israel, says: Like these good figs, so I regard as good the exiles from Judah I sent away from this place to the land of the Chaldeans. 6 I will keep my eyes on them for their good† and will return them to this land. I will build them up and not demolish them; I will plant them and not uproot them.† 7 I will give them a heart to know me,† that I am the Lord. They will be my people, and I will be their God because they will return to me with all their heart.†
8 “But as for the bad figs, so bad they are inedible,† this is what the Lord says: In this way I will deal with King Zedekiah of Judah, his officials, and the remnant of Jerusalem — those remaining in this land or living in the land of Egypt.† 9 I will make them an object of horror† and a disaster to all the kingdoms of the earth, an example for disgrace, scorn, ridicule,† and cursing, wherever I have banished them.† 10 I will send the sword, famine, and plague† against them until they have perished from the land I gave to them and their ancestors.”
God is very vengeful in the old testament.
 

The_Doc_Man

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AB, my response is of course steeped in atheism. To me it doesn't matter what the Bible says. It would not surprise me to learn that people have in the ancient past attributed all sorts of ills and plagues and disasters to God as his punishment for some imagined affronts because otherwise such things would be inexplicable in a world that was based on having causes for everything. A "strict causality" world has no coincidences. In a quantum mechanical world, "stuff happens."
 

vba_php

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God is very vengeful in the old testament.
Jesus washed away all the vengeance that you speak of. Until the last day on Earth of course, which is called, appropriately, THE DAY OF THE LORD.
 
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AB, my response is of course steeped in atheism. To me it doesn't matter what the Bible says. It would not surprise me to learn that people have in the ancient past attributed all sorts of ills and plagues and disasters to God as his punishment for some imagined affronts because otherwise such things would be inexplicable in a world that was based on having causes for everything. A "strict causality" world has no coincidences. In a quantum mechanical world, "stuff happens."
Doc, I was just curious about the historical writings not the religious aspect. Basically if what you said was historically correct.

We all have heard of locus and boils for sure, but when you read this,
I will send the sword, famine, and plague† against them until they have perished from the land I gave to them and their ancestors.”
is there ambiguity? I appreciate your view. Thanks.
 

The_Doc_Man

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The ambiguity is whether that passage reflects an excuse for the area to be in turmoil, or a reason for it. (Rhetorical, actually...) I've never known humans to NOT have an inborn reason to engage in actions that lead to war, famine, and disease. It is the inherent human focus on aggression, or perhaps dominance. That was given to us, not by God but by our evolutionary ancestors, the dinosaurs.
 

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